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Get the impression that every day an organization is apologizing for a sensitive data breach or stating that their systems have been breached? It’s not just you who feels this way. Cyberattacks and cybercrimes are on the rise, which is both frightening and concerning. Small businesses, too, are increasingly falling victim to data breaches, with hackers realizing that small firms may not have established a strong cybersecurity strategy.

10 Important Cybersecurity Best Practices

  1. EDUCATION

It’s far simpler to prevent a hack than it is to recover from one. Recovering your organization’s critical data after a ransomware attack can be time-consuming and difficult. Informing staff about basic security, personal cybersecurity, and the prevalence of cyber threats is an effective approach to prevent ransomware assaults before they cause damage. Employees should be aware that malicious

The average cost of a cyberattack is 3.86 million and the cumulative total for global cybercrime is expected to cost $6 trillion. If you don’t pay to train your employees about cybersecurity best practices—eventually you may end up paying more in the long run. High quality and free training for your employees are available from several government resources including K9 Cybersecurity.

  1. BETTER PASSWORDS AND MULTI-FACTOR AUTHENTICATION

Think no one will guess that your mother’s maiden name and birthdate are the passwords? Consider again. Cyberthieves have created sophisticated algorithms that can accurately identify complex passwords in a matter of seconds. Traditional password security advised utilizing a lengthy password with a mix of digits, characters, and lower-case letters as long as 12 characters at minimum.

However, while this is a smart approach, it isn’t enough, and almost every security expert exhorts the use of two-factor or multi-factor authentication. Two-factor authentication is a security procedure that needs two different forms of identification to gain access to programs or resources.

  1. KNOW YOUR COMPANY

Take advantage of a simple resource: your experience. Consider your firm and where hackers are likely to focus their efforts. Would they be interested in your workers’ personal information, or would they rather go after your clients’ databases or intellectual property? Locate the most probable targets and protect them effectively.

  1. SAFE AND SECURE WIFI

It may seem like a no-brainer for a company to have a protected, encrypted, and hidden WiFi network, but with the growing popularity of remote working, it’s critical that your staff safely encrypt their networks as well. Your employee’s security is also your own. It’s an easy method to eventually get access to the firm’s mainframe

  1. BACKUPS BACKUPS BACKUPS

Hacking is all about disrupting a company’s operations. An offline backup will allow your firm to get back on its feet as cybersecurity experts deal with the damage and fallout from a computer hack.

  1. INSTALL ANTI-VIRUS SOFTWARE

Even the most experienced employees make errors from time to time. Computers with anti-virus and anti-malware software installed offer an additional layer of security, especially against phishing scams—a social engineering attack that seeks to acquire data and login credentials by impersonating a trustworthy source.

  1. SECURE PHYSICAL DEVICES

Laptops should be secured with passwords or pins in the same manner that you lock your office doors when you leave. Laptops given to former employees should be reclaimed. Consider every work PC as a potential door into your organization.

  1. UPDATE SOFTWARE AND FIRMWARE

More than 80% of hacks are indirectly caused by outdated software (Centrify). The best anti-virus and anti-malware programs are only as good as their latest patches. Forgetting to install patches will allow hackers to exploit the system’s weaknesses.

  1. BE SAFE RATHER THAN SORRY

Is it possible that your email address is being used without your permission? Don’t bother clicking on it. A pop-up offer offering you a bargain? Ditto. Always Be Cautious is the ABC’s of cybersecurity. Before responding, double check where emails are coming from, especially if something seems odd.

  1. HAVE A PLAN

Having your own cybersecurity team might be costly as a small or medium-sized business owner. Fortunately, there are several free tools that can assist you in developing a basic cybersecurity strategy and indicating what actions to take if you have been hacked. We propose the FCC’s risk management plan, as well as the Small Business Administration’s cyber security guide.